A city of Nobel Prize winners

Krakow’s history is closely related to the biographies of all four Nobel Prize winners in literature who wrote in Polish. The Krakow Czas magazine published fragments of popular novels by Henryk Sienkiewicz (best known outside Poland for being the author of the historical novel set in ancient Rome Quo Vadis), winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1905. Meanwhile, Władysław Stanisław Reymont, winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1924 (the author of The Promised Land and The Peasants), often visited Krakow. The 1980 winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, poet, prose writer, and essayist, Czesław Miłosz (whose best-known works include The Captive MindThe Native Realm and many volumes of poetry) came to live in Krakow permanently in the last years of his life. Finally, Wisława Szymborska (known as the “Mozart of Poetry;” her most famous books include Calling Out to Yeti and People on the Bridge), honoured with the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1996, spent most of her life in Krakow.

 

Pic. Tomasz Wiech